Into the Vœrtex: Case study of a stereoscopic abstract animation installation | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 10, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2042-7875
  • E-ISSN: 2042-7883

Abstract

In Max Hattler’s stereoscopic installation two-dimensional abstract animation is turned into immersive images with strong three-dimensional depth. Utilizing a two-screen, semi-Cave Automatic Virtual Environment, creates a unique viewing experience for the viewer, a space situated halfway between immersion-in-abstraction and the real world of the gallery space, allowing the viewer to be in two spaces simultaneously. This article discusses the technical set-up, production processes and stereoscopic techniques, including binocular colour rivalry and depth displacements employed in This is followed by a discussion of in relation to the concept of lucidity and an audience study into viewers’ perception of the work. The hybrid set-up of , combining both stereoscopic and interactive visual texts, allows for a sense of creative inspiration and inquiry into the dreaming mind, and participants can actively choose to explore different aspects of their perception by oscillating between two divergent states: an immersive dream sensation and a sense of being anchored in the real world.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Award 11602919)
  • City University of Hong Kong (Award 7005173)
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2022-12-26
2024-02-28
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