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1981
Volume 3, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2049-3010
  • E-ISSN: 2049-3029

Abstract

Abstract

Poor rates of school completion combined with high rates of imprisonment mean that at least half the Indigenous young people in Australia are under-achieving, and are at risk of a future characterized by extreme disadvantage and disconnection from the mainstream. This research stemmed from an invitation from Indigenous elders to a non-Indigenous teaching artist experienced in intercultural drama and theatre, and began with a broad concern about how to reconnect disaffected Indigenous youth with education. Immersed in a new and unfamiliar cultural, social, political and environmental context, I developed a deeper understanding of Indigenous perspectives on partnerships, relationships and cultural safety, facilitated by the young people’s participation and the involvement of elders in three applied theatre projects. I found it necessary to adapt my approach to incorporate the making of short films as a medium of storytelling and as an initiative of the young people.

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/content/journals/10.1386/atr.3.1.21_1
2015-01-01
2024-06-14
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  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): engagement; film; Indigenous; partnership; transformative; youth
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