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1981
Volume 12, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2040-5669
  • E-ISSN: 2040-5677

Abstract

Reflecting on a specific case study commissioned for the 2020 Keir Choreographic Awards in Australia, this text investigates how the work sought to negotiate the relationship between menial, process-driven labour and dance/installation art. Developed as a collaboration between dance maker Alison Currie and visual artist David Cross, the work interrogated how Walter Benjamin’s and Martin Heidegger’s ideas on boredom and suspended time, respectively, might offer new considerations of task-based practice. This study specifically seeks to test key thresholds in relation to task-orientated discourse with the insertion of a series of counter-moments informed by Freud’s thinking around the uncanny. Playing with ideas of staging and set making at the intersection of art and dance, this text also seeks to interrogate how the building of an art installation offers a frame in which to understand dance and its assorted modalities in different ways. slips between functional and abstract, exploring live action as an unstable liminal space between labour and performance.

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/content/journals/10.1386/chor_00033_1
2021-12-01
2024-06-14
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  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): boredom; installation; repetition; task-based dance; time; uncanny
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