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1981
Volume 13, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2040-4344
  • E-ISSN: 2040-4352

Abstract

Using textual analysis, this article reflects on Adekunle Gold’s (‘goodness’). It situates the song within the Nigerian contemporary orientation of ascribing ‘goodness’ to the Global North as a propellant for greener pasture quest abroad. It unpacks the representation of the images of time, returns, supplication and homeland opportunities for migrants who, over time, have not met their expectation(s) in host countries. The song affirms the call by ‘goodness’ in the homeland for migrants to return. This call to look back on the homeland’s ‘goodness’ discredits the assumption that there are better opportunities abroad. The discussion foregrounds Gold’s admonishment to work hard, considering that regardless of location, can only be appropriated if one metaphorically waters the ground. The metaphoric resonance of ground watering underscores the contemporary construction of African youths as non-resourceful. It accentuates the understanding that the prerequisite for achieving ‘goodness’ is fundamentally the same both at home and on ‘the other side’. However, Gold impliedly realizes some hardworking individuals have not relented in watering the ground; yet, all efforts have proven fruitless. The climax of the sudden realization that concerted efforts can sometimes be futile and the fear of imagined poverty plunges the singer into a state of supplication and plea to his (‘destiny’) to lead him along a fruitful path. Reflecting on the track’s overarching philosophical import, the article concludes that the achievement of is not a function of place, but hard work in harmony with

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2023-01-30
2024-07-16
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