Skip to content
1981
Volume 7, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2057-0384
  • E-ISSN: 2057-0392

Abstract

A structural model for drawing articulates the elements that come together to produce mark-making. This model was inspired by Choreology, the study of movement initiated by dance artist and educator Rudolf Laban in the first half of the twentieth century. Laban developed theories for movement to help dancers better understand the expressive potential of their bodies. His analysis, together with subsequent scholars, defines how the human body moves in space. In the way dancers and choreographers gain analytical skills and greater awareness of their movement choices through studying Choreology, so visual artists can gain a new understanding of mark-making and its relationship to the body by looking at drawing through the lens of movement theory. This project was carried out during my research in Creative Practice at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, 2017–19. In the process of developing the model for drawing, I created a palette of marks by testing out a range of movements with different mark-making tools such as pens, pencils, watercolours and paint sticks. These marks correspond to Laban’s Effort Actions, a list of eight physical actions the body can make. The resulting artworks have a particular energy and visual language to them. Their creation is driven by the way the mark-maker moves their whole body in a choreographed drawing performance. Through physical actions, the mark-maker becomes aware that specific movements make specific marks. The appearance of these marks is influenced by the form and the effort of the physical movement, by the surface material, its orientation, and by the mark-making instrument and its colour. Designing a structural model for drawing has given me a deeper insight into the process of embodied drawing and performance, enabling me to make informed choices about the visual traces I create through moving my body in different ways.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1386/drtp_00084_1
2022-04-01
2024-06-14
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Auslander, P.. ( 1999), Liveness: Performance in a Mediatized Culture, London and New York:: Routledge;.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bachelard, G.,, Jolas, M., and Gilson, E.. ( 1994), La poétique de l’espace (The Poetics of Space), Boston, MA:: Beacon Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Brandt, R.. ( 2017), in-person conversation with L. Oppenheim, Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance , 12 October.
  4. Butterworth, J., and Wildschut, L.. (eds) ( 2017), Contemporary Choreography: A Critical Reader, , 2nd ed.., Abingdon and New York:: Routledge;.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Curtis-Jones, A.. ( 2017), addition to The Strands of the Dance Medium Model, e-mail communication with the author, Trinity Laban Conservatoire .
  6. Davies, E.. ( 2006), Beyond Dance: Laban’s Legacy of Movement Analysis, New York:: Routledge;.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Eleey, P.. ( 2014;), ‘ If you couldn’t see me: The drawings of Trisha Brown. ’, in E. Carpenter. (ed.), On Performativity, Living Collections Catalogue, vol. 1, Minneapolis, MN:: Walker Art Center;, http://walkerart.org/collections/publications/performativity/drawings-of-trisha-brown/. Accessed 28 March 2018.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Grasse, V.. ( 2014;), ‘ Wandering as pathscaping: Walking and drawing through an urban environment – A somatic and dance improvisation informed practice. ’, MA dissertation, London:: Trinity Laban;.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Ingold, T.. ( 2016), Lines: A Brief History, London and New York:: Routledge;.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Irvine, Rosanna. ( n.d.), what remains and is to come, https://www.rosannairvine.com/projects/what-remains-and-is-to-come/. Accessed 8 February 2018.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Laban, R. von. ( 2012), Choreutics, Alton:: Dance Books;.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Laban, R. von, and Lawrence, F. C.. ( 1974), Effort: Economy of Human Movement, , 2nd ed.., London:: Macdonald & Evans;.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Laban, R. von, and Ullmann, L.. ( 1984), A Vision of Dynamic Space, London:: Laban Archives in association with Falmer;.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Laban, R., and Ullmann, L.. ( 2011), Mastery of Movement, Binsted:: Dance Books Ltd;.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Main, L.. ( 2017), Transmissions in Dance: Contemporary Staging Practices, New York:: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, Palgrave Macmillan;.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Maletic, V.. ( 1987), Body, Space, Expression: The Development of Rudolf Laban’s Movement and Dance Concepts, vol. 75 of Approaches to Semiotics, Berlin:: Mouton de Gruyter;.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Maslen, M., and Southern, J.. (eds) ( 2011), Drawing Projects: An Exploration of the Language of Drawing, London:: Black Dog;.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Moors, H.. ( 2003;), ‘ Are you dancing or drawing?: A workshop for dancers and visual artists to stimulate creative practice. ’, MA dissertation, London:: Trinity Laban;.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Nelson, R.. ( 2013), Practice as Research in the Arts: Principles, Protocols, Pedagogies, Resistances, Basingstoke and New York:: Palgrave Macmillan;.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Pallasmaa, J.. ( 2007), The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses, Chichester:: Wiley-Academy;.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Preston-Dunlop, V. M.. ( 1980), Dance Is a Language, Isn’t It?, London:: Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, Laban Library and Archive;.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Preston-Dunlop, V. M.. ( 1984), Point of Departure: The Dancer’s Space, London:: V. Preston-Dunlop;.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Preston-Dunlop, V.. ( 2010;), ‘ The dynamic body in space: Exploring and developing Rudolf Laban’s ideas for the 21st century. ’, Laban International Conference, 24–26 October 2008, Alton:: Dance Books;.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Preston-Dunlop, V., and Geary, A.. ( 2014), Looking at Dances: A Choreological Perspective on Choreography, Binsted:: Noverre Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Preston-Dunlop, V. M., and Sanchez-Colberg, A.. ( 2002), Dance and the Performative: A Choreological Perspective: Laban and Beyond, London:: Verve;.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Shelton, A.. ( 2001;), ‘ Drawn to perform: An investigation into the idea of drawing as performance. ’, MA dissertation, London:: Trinity Laban;.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Stephanie Schober & Dance Company ( n.d.;), Tracing Gestures. , http://stephanieschober-researchprojects.weebly.com/works.html. Accessed 1 February 2018.
  28. Tate ( n.d.), Performance Art Painting and Performance, http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/p/performance-art/painting-and-performance. Accessed 1 May 2019.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Tufnell, M., and Crickmay, C.. ( 2006), Body Space Image: Notes Towards Improvisation and Performance, London:: Dance Books;.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Warr, T., and Jones, A.. (eds) ( 2012), The Artist’s Body, abridged, rev. ed. , London and New York:: Phaidon;.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Oppenheim, Leonora. ( 2022;), ‘ A structural model for drawing: Investigating mark-making through Choreology. ’, Drawing: Research, Theory, Practice, 7:1, pp. 13954, https://doi.org/10.1386/drtp_00084_1
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1386/drtp_00084_1
Loading
/content/journals/10.1386/drtp_00084_1
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a success
Invalid data
An error occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error