1981
Volume 22, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1466-0407
  • E-ISSN: 1758-9118

Abstract

In attempting to construct a coherent narrative from the shocking events of September 11, 2001, American news anchors, reporters and officials faced the problem of an absence at the ‘center’ - a displacement of the main character whose agency was needed if the story were to unfold as expected. The rhetorical and narrative strategies called upon to fill this gap - to renegotiate the terms of the emerging narrative ‘on the fly’ - offer a rare, real-time glimpse of American cultural ‘story-making’ in operation.

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/content/journals/10.1386/ejac.22.1.85.16644
2003-05-01
2022-11-29
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