Radical Interpretation, the primacy of communication, and the bounds of language | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 1, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1757-1952
  • E-ISSN: 1757-1960

Abstract

In the first section of this paper I review the notion of Radical Interpretation, introduced by Donald Davidson in order to account for linguistic meaning and propositional thought. It is then argued that this concept, as embedded in Davidson's whole philosophical system, gives rise to a view of communication as a key explanatory concept in the social sciences. In the second section of the paper it is shown how this view bears upon the question as to what the bounds of linguistic behaviour are. As opposed to major psychological and sociological perspectives on language, Davidson's communication-centred position gives rise to an inclusive, context-dependent answer to this question.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1386/ejpc.1.1.123/1
2009-11-01
2024-05-27
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1386/ejpc.1.1.123/1
Loading
  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): Davidson; interpretation; philosophy of communication
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a success
Invalid data
An error occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error