Hailing black holes: Rhetorical realism in the age of hyperobjects | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 12, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1757-1952
  • E-ISSN: 1757-1960

Abstract

This article addresses the challenge philosophical realism poses to the field of rhetoric by exploring the possibility of symbolic communion with nonhuman entities. As a matter of framing, I invoke Timothy Morton’s concept of the hyperobject to better understand the complexities of communicating with and about sublime nonhuman objects such as black holes. I then delineate how the stylistic modality of the weird best exploits the chasm between autonomous thingness and human (re)presentation that is a primary source of consternation for rhetorical realism. Finally, I draw from Kathe Koja’s (1991) novel to reconsider a bizarre rhetoric of black holes which displays the omnipresent tension of accessible-alterity characteristic of the struggle to rhetorically breach the nonhuman world.

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2021-12-01
2024-05-27
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  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): black holes; hyperobjects; nonhuman; ontology; realism; rhetoric
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