Classic design: From cultural knowledge to individual experience | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 7, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 2050-0726
  • E-ISSN: 2050-0734

Abstract

Understanding the aesthetic response to classic design has become a prominent part of the consumption process. Classic design has been equated with understanding its artistic forms through the user because aesthetic response to classic design is influenced by personal desires that are informed by, and part of, collective cultural knowledge. It is, therefore, essential to understand the aesthetic response to classic design as an expression of culturally transmitted meanings based on user data. Following a survey identifying examples of classic design, participants volunteered for in-depth interviews and to bring in and discuss self-identified classic designs from their personal wardrobes. Findings indicated that though participants described a similar cultural concept of classic, they simultaneously identified a range of concrete examples that best fit their own unique needs and experiences.

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2020-10-01
2024-02-25
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  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): aesthetic experience; characteristics; classic; culture; design; user
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