On the issue of diaspora’s terminological dispersal | Intellect Skip to content
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Volume 1, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2632-5853
  • E-ISSN: 2632-5861

Abstract

This analytical scoping review contributes to the debate about the diaspora’s terminological dispersal that has dominated scholarly discourse in the past two decades. The author argues that diaspora as a ‘metaphoric designation’ is a useful conceptual entry point to chart the multiplicity of ways in which diaspora research has evolved in the twenty-first century. From this premise, diaspora as a ‘metaphoric designation’ mitigates against the ‘nostalgia-premised’ definitions of diasporas and could resolve the concerns about ‘terminological dispersal’ that have proliferated in diaspora studies.

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2020-06-01
2024-02-22
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  • Article Type: Editorial
Keyword(s): diaspora; global migration; hybridity; metaphor; methods; theories
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