1981
1980s Horror Film Culture
  • ISSN: 2040-3275
  • E-ISSN: 2040-3283

Abstract

Jackie Kong released four feature films between 1981 and 1987, including the horror films (1981) and (1987). She directed all four films, while also working variously as screenwriter, producer and editor on individual productions. In this essay, I use Kong’s experiences of making horror films in the 1980s as a way of critically revisiting our histories of 1980s horror film culture. I offer a feminist model of doing horror film history: not only uncovering and illuminating the unknown or little-known work of women in horror film, but also critically thinking about the way we write our histories, and what this might say about our representation of personal, cultural and national identities. Ultimately, this essay is guided by the following question: what might a feminist historiography of horror cinema look like?

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Arts and Humanities Research Council (Award AH/W000105/1)
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2022-10-01
2023-02-07
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