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Embodying Eco-Consciousness: Somatics, Aesthetic Practices & Social Action
  • ISSN: 1757-1871
  • E-ISSN: 1757-188X

Abstract

When was the last time you danced and sang together with other people, just for the joy of it? As the COVID pandemic exacerbates mental health issues, we are seeing also a rise in so-called eco-anxiety. Awareness of humans forming part of larger ecologies can no longer be ignored as a medically relevant topic. Can contemporary eco-somatic practices contribute to shifting eco-anxieties, and to shaping human awareness of ecosystemic diversity and embeddedness? Singing–dancing together are time-honoured ways of maintaining and restoring individual or group health and happiness, and engendering embeddedness. Drawing on research with egalitarian Baka groups in Central Africa and with shifting–sliding fascia connective tissues, the proposition made here is to activate singing–dancing–laughing, not only as a method of somatic vocal training or pedagogy, but also as a way of shaping community and honouring ecosystemic nestedness. Through this, we may further come to appreciate Earth as co-guider in eco-somatic practices.

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2021-12-01
2024-03-04
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