ChoiceScript and developer-mediated self-curation | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 15, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1757-191X
  • E-ISSN: 1757-1928

Abstract

This article looks at how games created with the authoring tool create a situation in which players construct a sense of self using the developer’s assumptions hidden within the code. Some interactive narratives use statistics (also called ‘alignment systems’) to keep track of player choices, saving them in the form of character descriptions such as ‘Good’, ‘Humanity’ or ‘Booksmarts’. is an authoring tool designed to encourage the creation of text-based interactive narratives that heavily revolve around such stats and the prominent display of a ‘Show Stats’ page. This article explores how many games use the procedural enthymeme to embed the developer’s assumptions into their stats. Many games also have a structure that is evocative of pop culture personality tests. These two elements – the procedural enthymeme and a pop culture personality test structure – combine to generate an experience of developer-mediated self-curation.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship
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/content/journals/10.1386/jgvw_00068_1
2023-06-06
2024-05-19
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