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1981
Volume 10, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2052-0204
  • E-ISSN:

Abstract

In modern higher education, students are more vocal about their preferences and lifestyles. This attribute has allowed educators to introduce subjects that were previously considered taboo in the classroom. Students’ expressive and experimental nature also calls for new ways to blend pedagogy with their interests. This article focuses on my course, ‘Sequential art for mental health’, offered to post-graduate design students at a university. One student, Monika, who suffers from severe alopecia, shared her journey of transitioning from being a patient to an author of her condition by creating a graphic narrative in the form of a zine. This article highlights the essential factors that educators should consider to facilitate successful transitions in the classroom. As mental health disorders continue to affect more students, medical interventions are being implemented to address the issue. However, those suffering from these disorders still face many challenges in their daily lives. Mental health remains a top priority in universities, particularly for students. While an artist’s depiction of mental illness may differ from that of a patient’s personal experience, this article stresses the importance of using illustrations and sequential art to promote mental health. Co-creative learning and collaborative participation methods are recommended in this article as effective strategies for achieving this goal. Additionally, fundamental skills such as drawing are highlighted as valuable tools for self-improvement and awareness. Ultimately, this article explores the intersection of pedagogy, illustration and expression, paving the way for new directions in education and learning.

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2024-05-22
2024-07-21
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