Writing for instructional screens: Expanding the scope for screenwriting practitioners | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 13, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1759-7137
  • E-ISSN: 1759-7145

Abstract

At the beginning of the pandemic, discussions in the Screenwriting Research Network questioned the validity of educating students for limited career opportunities as future screenwriters. Research into graduate pathways suggests employment opportunities for creative practitioners are far more complex with many creative practitioners embedded in diverse industries such as marketing, information technology and, primarily, the education sector. The rapid growth of online education presents a key opportunity for screenwriters to apply their craft skills and knowledge to an alternative disciplinary context. Storytelling, as a means of engaging learners or an audience, is a major area of overlap for screenwriters and designers of instructional resources. Stories that emotionally engage an audience have greater impact on the learner and assist in memory retention. A key tool for emotional engagement is the use of humour which has also been shown to facilitate learning. Writers of narrative comedy possess skills in creating humorous situations that can present challenging or serious topics through a comic perspective. This article argues that the growth in online education presents screenwriting graduates with unique opportunities to apply their skills to an alternative discipline that can streamline their transition to a career in writing for screens beyond traditional film and television.

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2022-07-01
2024-02-28
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