Learning the ‘tracker’ process: A case study into popular music pedagogy | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 4, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2397-6721
  • E-ISSN: 2397-673X

Abstract

The ‘tracker’ production process is a modern form of music production agency where top-line songwriters work with music programmers called ‘trackers’, primarily within the confines of the digital audio workstation. In this case, production, songwriting and performance often happen concurrently, and collaboration involves the synthesis of ideas, musical negotiations and expertise in using digital and online technologies. In providing popular music production learning activities that translate to professional contexts, higher education institutions face a number of challenges, particularly where much of the collaboration is undertaken online. This article reports on a cohort of Bachelor of Popular Music students who undertook a tracker process module. Students’ perceptions of ‘engagement’ and ‘learning’ were captured via an assessment item and survey, and a themed analysis indicated that the pedagogy promoted the use of diverse social skills, was highly collaborative, relied both on specialist and non-specialist knowledge, and involved the use of digital and online communications.

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2020-07-01
2024-05-27
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