Imposter syndrome: A case study on the experiences and perspectives of a teenage feminist indie band | Intellect Skip to content
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Girls and Women in Popular Music Education
  • ISSN: 2397-6721
  • E-ISSN: 2397-673X

Abstract

This research article features the perspectives of two young women who create and perform as an indie band together. Their stories demonstrate a stark contrast between their relative success in this early stage of their career and the obstacles that they continue to face. Linked to an underlying feeling of imposter syndrome, they reveal an ongoing struggle with confidence as musicians, resentment of the gentrification and closure of music venues, unsupportive high school teachers and administration and age-related barriers to the indie music scene. Encounters with sexism and ageism within the music scene and industry allude to systemic issues resulting in a dearth of musical spaces in which young artists can participate safely. Through interrogation of existing pathways to musical experiences and deeper understanding of young artists and their experiences within these avenues, attention to these discrepancies is critical in all settings of music education.

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2022-07-01
2024-02-25
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