Skip to content
1981
Cultural Reimaginings of New Zealand and Australia
  • ISSN: 2050-4039
  • E-ISSN: 2050-4047

Abstract

In (2015), Patricia Grace offers an insightful glimpse into the complexities of cross-cultural communication as she recounts the vicissitudes of a Māori–Japanese–Hawaiian family throughout the course of the twentieth century. This article focuses on the representation of alterity as an empowering source of enrichment for individuals and communities by referencing Emmanuel Levinas’s ethics of the Other. It is argued that emphasizes the significance of cherishing Otherness in its infinity, instead of attempting to enclose it in well-established frameworks. In doing so, the novel grants precedence to interaction immersed in the Levinasian ‘saying’ – being together, listening to each other and exchanging stories, viewpoints and languages without establishing the relations of domination and subordination – over communication entrenched in the ‘said’, whose aim is to gain the complete understanding of the Other. In this context, the article discusses the motif of translation. And while translation aims to transform the foreign into the familiar, it functions in the novel not as a tool for abolishing alterity, but as a contact zone where different cultures enter into a creative dialogue. Translating stories is portrayed as a communal activity, whereby all those involved encounter one another on equal terms, contributing their own experiences and perceptions of the world – their respective baskets from the Māori proverb referred to in this article’s title.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1386/nzps_00091_1
2022-06-01
2024-06-13
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Ben-Ari, Adital, and Strier, Roni. ( 2010;), ‘ Rethinking cultural competence: What can we learn from Levinas. ’, British Journal of Social Work, 40:7, pp. 215567.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Blanchot, Maurice. ( 1997), Friendship (trans. Elizabeth Rottenberg), Stanford, CA:: Stanford University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Critchley, Simon. ( 2004;), ‘ Introduction. ’, in Simon Critchley, and Robert Bernasconi. (eds), The Cambridge Companion to Levinas, New York:: Cambridge University Press;, pp. 132.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Davidson, Scott. ( 2012;), ‘ Linguistic hospitality: The task of translation in Ricoeur and Levinas. ’, Analecta Hermenutica, 4, pp. 114.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Ferri, Guliana. ( 2014;), ‘ Ethical communication and intercultural responsibility: A philosophical perspective. ’, Language and Intercultural Communication, 14:1, pp. 723.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Fresno-Calleja, Paloma. ( 2003;), ‘ An interview with Patricia Grace. ’, Atlantis, 25:1, pp. 10920.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Grace, Patricia. ( 2015), Chappy, Auckland:: Penguin Random House New Zealand;.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Kamuf, Peggy. ( 1997;), ‘ Violence, identity, self-determination, and the question of justice: On Specters of Marx. ’, in Hent de Vries, and Samuel Weber. (eds), Violence, Identity, and Self-determination, Stanford, CA:: Stanford University Press;, pp. 27183.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Levinas, Emmanuel. ( 1987), Time and the Other (And Additional Essays) (trans. Richard A. Cohen), Pittsburgh, PA:: Duquesne University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Levinas, Emmanuel. ( 2006), Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence (trans. Alphonso Lingis), Pittsburgh, PA:: Duquesne University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Levinas, Emmanuel. ( 2007), Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority (trans. Alphonso Lingis), Pittsburgh, PA:: Duquesne University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Martino, Luís Mauro Sá, and Marques, Ângela Cristina Salgueiro. ( 2019;), ‘ Communication as alterity’s ethics: Explorations with Lévinas. ’, Intercom: Revista Brasileira de Ciências da Comunicação, 42:3, pp. 2139.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Peperzak, Adriaan. ( 1993), To the Other: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, West Lafayette, IN:: Purdue University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Pereen, Esther. ( 2010;), ‘ Everyday ghosts and the ghostly everyday in Amos Tutuola, Ben Okri and Achille Mbembe. ’, in Maria del Pilar Blanco, and Esther Pereen. (eds), Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture, New York:: Continuum;, pp. 10617.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Pilhofer, Katharina. ( 2011), Cultural Knowledge: A Critical Perspective on the Concept as a Foundation for Respect for Cultural Differences, Hamburg:: Diplomica Verlag;.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Pistacchi, Ann. ( 2008;), ‘ Te whare tapa wha: The four cornerstones of Maori health and Patricia Grace’s Dogside Story. ’, Journal of New Zealand Literature, 26, pp. 13652.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Sanders, Craig. ( 2016;), ‘ An unfinished story of meaningful sorrow. ’, Antipodes, 30:2, pp. 41415.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Sarti, Antonella. ( 1998), Spiritcarvers: Interviews with Eighteen Writers from New Zealand, Amsterdam:: Rodopi;.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Waldenfels, Bernhard. ( 2002;), ‘ Levinas and the face of the other. ’, in Simon Critchley, and Robert Bernasconi. (eds), The Cambridge Companion to Levinas, New York:: Cambridge University Press;, pp. 6381.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Orzechowska, Anna. ( 2022;), ‘ “Nāu te rourou, nāku te rourou, ka ora te manuhiri” (“With your food basket, and my food basket, the visitors will be fed”): Alterity, exchange and translation in Patricia Grace’s Chappy (2015). ’, Journal of New Zealand & Pacific Studies, 10:1, pp. 3750, https://doi.org/10.1386/nzps_00091_1
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1386/nzps_00091_1
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a success
Invalid data
An error occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error