Design for circularity through Aesthetic Surgery | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Circular Economy in Fashion and Textiles
  • ISSN: 2754-026X
  • E-ISSN: 2754-0278

Abstract

This article introduces the term Aesthetic Surgery as a strategy for the designer to contribute to circular economy. Our aim is to discuss this strategy as a way for designers to employ their core competencies to create and innovate the potential of irrelevant materials (waste) through aesthetic means and a material-driven design process. We argue that designers have the skills and experience to seek opportunities in unwanted materials and keep them in a loop of relevance and at a high value. In recent years, mechanical recycling has been gaining footing in the industry. Recycling has, therefore, primarily been concerned with material recovery at fibre level. This can appear to be an easy way to continue business as usual. Yet, this approach is not suitable for all types of materials and material blends and requires further innovation to develop solutions for these situations. Furthermore, these recycling methods use external resources in the process of bringing the material to a point zero and do not utilize the existing parts, components and material qualities. At the same time, sustainable transition requires a break with traditions of large volume productions and fast fashion. Therefore, we argue that we need to broaden the understanding and perspective of recycling and upcycling. The research presented in this article explores fashion and textiles methods of working with aesthetics by proposing Aesthetic Surgery as a material-driven design strategy for recycling and upcycling. Working with aesthetics is well known as a powerful means to create desires and spark imaginations, in this article we suggest turning the attention towards these powerful aesthetic competencies to substantiate the potential of irrelevant (waste) materials. The discussion emerging from this practice-based research offers the potential to further explore the possibilities in design for circularity through an Aesthetic Surgery strategy which may empower designers to contribute to circular economy.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1386/sft_0012_1
2022-10-01
2024-02-29
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Binotto, C., and Payne, A.. ( 2017;), ‘ The poetics of waste: Contemporary fashion practice in the context of wastefulness. ’, Fashion Practice, 9:1, pp. 529, https://doi.org/10.1080/17569370.2016.1226604. Accessed 24 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Conner-Crabb, A.. ( 2017;), ‘ Fashion design for longevity: Design strategies and their implementation in practice. ’, Ph.D. thesis, Brighton:: University of Brighton;.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. The Danish Consumer Council ( 2020), Nyt tøj i affaldet (‘New clothes in the waste'’), Copenhagen:: Econet;.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Den Hollander, M. C.,, Bakker, C. A., and Hultink, E. J.. ( 2017;), ‘ Product design in a circular economy: Development of a typology of key concepts and terms. ’, Journal of Industrial Ecology, 21:3, pp. 51725, https://doi.org/10.1111/jiec.12610. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Design School Kolding ( 2021;), ‘ FashionSEEDS handbook of sustainability teaching materials. ’, November, https://www.fashionseeds.org/_files/ugd/ed0694_488bb65b79484e3584efcac84e16773c.pdf. Accessed 1 February 2022.
  6. Eckert, C., and Stacey, M.. ( 2000;), ‘ Sources of inspiration: A language of design. ’, Design Studies, 21:5, pp. 52338, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0142-694X(00)00022-3. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Eckert, C., and Stacey, M.. ( 2003;), ‘ Sources of inspiration in industrial practice: The case of knitwear design. ’, Journal of Design Research, 3:1, pp. 1644, https://doi.org/10.1504/JDR.2003.009826. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Eileen Fisher Renew ( 2022;), ‘ The resewn collection. ’, https://www.eileenfisherrenew.com/shop/resewn-collection. Accessed 1 February 2022.
  9. Ellen MacArthur Foundation ( 2017;), ‘ A new textiles economy: Redesigning fashion’s future. ’, 1 December, https://emf.thirdlight.com/link/2axvc7eob8zx-za4ule/@/preview/1?o. Accessed 1 February 2022.
  10. Ellen MacArthur Foundation ( 2021;), ‘ Circular business models: Redefining growth for a thriving fashion industry. ’, https://emf.thirdlight.com/link/circular-business-models-report/@/preview/1?o. Accessed 1 February 2022.
  11. European Commission ( 2020;), ‘ A new Circular Economy Action Plan for a cleaner and more competitive Europe. ’, Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, COM(2020) 98 final; 3.5: Textiles, 11 March, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/resource.html?uri=cellar:9903b325-6388-11ea-b735-01aa75ed71a1.0017.02/DOC_1&format=PDF. Accessed 1 February 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. European Commission ( 2022;), ‘ EU strategy for sustainable and circular textiles. ’, Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, COM(2022) 141 final, 30 March, https://ec.europa.eu/environment/publications/textiles-strategy_en. Accessed 24 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Köhler, A.,, Watson, D.,, Trzepacz, S.,, Löw, C.,, Liu, R.,, Danneck, J.,, Konstantas, A.,, Donatello, S., and Faraca, G.. ( 2021;), ‘ Circular economy perspectives in the EU textile sector: Final report: Publications office. ’, Publications Office of the European Union, 11 June, https://doi.org/10.2760/858144. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. FashionSEEDS ( 2021;), ‘ Activity learning tool. ’, https://www.fashionseeds.org/link-activity-learning-tool-1-2-title-2. Accessed 1 February 2022.
  15. Fiore, A. M., and Kimle, P. A.. ( 1997), Understanding Aesthetics for the Merchandising and Design Professional, New York:: Fairchild Publications;.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Fletcher, K., and Grose, L.. ( 2012), Fashion & Sustainability: Design for Change, London:: Laurence King;.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Fletcher, K., and Tham, M.. ( 2004;), ‘ Clothing rhythms. ’, in E. van Hinte. (ed.), Eternally Yours: Time in Design: Product Value Sustenance, Rotterdam:: 010 Publishers;, pp. 25474.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Fletcher, K., and Tham, M.. ( 2019), Earth Logic Fashion Action Research Plan, London:: The J J Charitable Trust;, https://earthlogic.info/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Earth-Logic-eversion.pdf. Accessed 1 February 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Goldsworthy, K.,, Earley, R., and Politowicz, K.. ( 2018;), ‘ Circular speeds: A review of fast and slow sustainable design approaches for fashion and textile applications. ’, Journal of Textile Design Research and Practice, 6:1, pp. 4265, https://doi.org/10.1080/20511787.2018.1467197. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Hasling, K. M., and Ræbild, U.. ( 2021;), ‘ Building sustainable material narratives with material pathways. ’, 23rd International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, Herning, Denmark, 9–10 June, https://doi.org/10.35199/EPDE.2021.4. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Hatch, K. L.. ( 1993), Textile Science, St Paul, MN:: West Publishing Company;.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Karana, E.,, Barati, B.,, Rognoli, V., and Zeeuw van der Laan, A.. ( 2015;), ‘ Material driven design (MDD): A method to design for material experiences. ’, International Journal of Design, 2:9, pp. 3554.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Koskinen, I. K.,, Zimmerman, J.,, Binder, T.,, Redström, J., and Wensveen, S.. ( 2011), Design Research through Practice: From the Lab, Field, and Showroom, Waltham, MA:: Morgan Kaufmann;.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Kozlowski, A.,, Bardecki, M., and Searcy, C.. ( 2019;), ‘ Tools for sustainable fashion design: An analysis of their fitness for purpose. ’, Sustainability, 11:13, p. 3581, https://doi.org/10.3390/su11133581. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Laitala, K.,, Klepp, I. G., and Henry, B.. ( 2018;), ‘ Does use matter? Comparison of environmental impacts of clothing based on fiber type. ’, Sustainability, 10:7, p. 2524, https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072524. Accessed 24 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Lettmann, S.. ( 2021;), ‘ Let’s play fashion: Circular design cards and the circular design matrix. ’, Sustainable Innovation 2021, Accelerating Sustainability in Fashion, Clothing, Sportswear & Accessories Conference: 23rd International Conference, London:, 15–21 March.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Maldini, I., and Balkenende, A. R.. ( 2017;), ‘ Reducing clothing production volumes by design: A critical review of sustainable fashion strategies. ’, in C. Bakker, and R. Mugge. (eds), Volume 9: PLATE: Product Lifetimes and the Environment: Conference Proceedings, Delft, 8–10 November, Amsterdam:: IOS Press;, pp. 23337, https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-820-4-233. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. McDonough, W., and Braungart, M.. ( 2002), Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, New York:: North Point Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary ( 2022), , 11th ed.., Springfield, MA:: Merriam-Webster Incorporated;, https://www.merriam-webster.com. Accessed 1 February 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Niinimäki, K.. ( 2011;), ‘ From disposable to sustainable: The complex interplay between design and consumption of textiles and clothing. ’, Ph.D. thesis, Helsinki:: Aalto University, School of Art and Design;.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Niinimäki, K.. ( 2014;), ‘ Green aesthetics in clothing: Normative beauty in commodities. ’, Artifact, 3:3, pp. 113, http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/artifact/article/view/3653/19727. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Niinimäki, K.. ( 2018), Fashion in a Circular Economy, Helsinki:: Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture;.
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Niinimäki, K.,, Peters, G.,, Dahlbo, H.,, Perry, P.,, Rissanen, T., and Gwilt, A.. ( 2020;), ‘ The environmental price of fast fashion. ’, Nature Reviews Earth & Environment, 1:4, pp. 189200, https://doi.org/10.1038/s43017-020-0039-9. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Ræbild, U.. ( 2015;), ‘ Uncovering fashion design method practice: The influence of body, time and collection. ’, Ph.D. thesis, Kolding:: Design School Kolding;.
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Ræbild, U.,, Hasling, K. M., and Kofoed, L. H.. ( 2017;), ‘ Sustainable design cards. ’, https://sustainabledesigncards.dk. Accessed 1 February 2022.
  36. Ræbild, U., and Riisberg, V.. ( 2018;), ‘ Exploring design students: Translations from brief to prototypes. ’, Global Fashion Conference, London College of Fashion, London, 31 October–1 November.
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Ravnløkke, L.. ( 2019;), ‘ Design af strikbluser til lang levetid: Strikkede prototyper som redskab for brugerdialog i designprocessen. ’ (‘ Design of knitted jumpers for longevity: Knitted prototypes as a tool for user dialogue in the design process. ’), Ph.D. thesis, Kolding:: Design School Kolding;.
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Redström, J.. ( 2017), Making Design Theory, Cambridge, MA:: The MIT Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Rissanen, T.. ( 2018;), ‘ Fashion design education as leadership development. ’, Global Fashion Conference, London College of Fashion, London, 31 October –1 November.
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Runnel, A.,, Raihan, K.,, Castle, N.,, Oja, D., and Bhuiya, H.. ( 2017;), ‘ The undiscovered business potential of production leftovers within global fashion supply chains: Creating a digitally enhanced circular economy. ’, Reverse Resources, https://www.reverseresources.net/. Accessed 1 February 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Schön, D. A.. ( [1983] 1991), The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action, , 11th ed.., Aldershot:: Avebury Ashgate;.
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Skjold, E.,, Kristiansen, M.,, Larsen, A. T.,, Melchiorsen, H.,, Frederiksen, H.,, Nielsen, M. D.,, Baggesen, A.,, Constatinou, G.,, Bundgaard-Nielsen, M. J.,, Guldager, S., and Ibsen, J. P.. ( 2021), Take-Back of Textiles: Circularity in Denmark, Herning:: Lifestyle and Design Cluster;.
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Thomas, K.. ( 2020;), ‘ Cultures of sustainability in the fashion industry. ’, Fashion Theory, 24:5, pp. 71542, https://doi.org/10.1080/1362704X.2018.1532737. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Townsend, K., and Goulding, R.. ( 2011;), ‘ The interaction of two and three dimensional design in textiles and fashion. ’, in A. Briggs-Goode, and K. Townsend. (eds), Textile Design: Principles, Advances and Applications, Cambridge:: Woodhead Publishing Limited;, pp. 288324, https://doi.org/10.1533/9780857092564.3.288. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Van Bezooyen, A.. ( 2014;), ‘ Materials driven design. ’, in E. Karana,, O. Pedgley, and V. Rognoli. (eds), Materials Experience: Fundamentals of Materials and Design, Amsterdam:: Butterworth-Heinemann;, pp. 27786.
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Yin, R. K.. ( 2013;), ‘ Validity and generalization in future case study evaluations. ’, Evaluation, 19:3, pp. 32132, https://doi.org/10.1177/1356389013497081. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Zborowska, A.. ( 2015;), ‘ Deconstruction in contemporary fashion design: Analysis and critique. ’, International Journal of Fashion Studies, 2:2, pp. 185201, https://doi.org/10.1386/infs.2.2.185_1. Accessed 18 May 2022.
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Ravnløkke, Louise, and Ræbild, Ulla. ( 2022;), ‘ Design for circularity through Aesthetic Surgery. ’, International Journal of Sustainable Fashion & Textiles, 1:2, pp. 22348, https://doi.org/10.1386/sft_0012_1
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1386/sft_0012_1
Loading
/content/journals/10.1386/sft_0012_1
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a success
Invalid data
An error occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error