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1981
Volume 13, Issue 1-2
  • ISSN: 1477-965X
  • E-ISSN: 1758-9533

Abstract

Abstract

In this era of terabytes and big data, the field of digital culture and art is witnessing an emergence of dystopian lines of criticism denouncing new forms of programmed governmentality and ubiquitous surveillance, placing societies, lifestyles and the human psyche under the control of algorithms. These criticisms are so negative because they start from a belief of human autonomy from technology. To examine the other side of this argument, this article aims to discuss the coevolution of humans and technology. To accomplish this aim, the article is based on the writings and practice of the artist and theorist Roy Ascott, in whose work can be found the most original and significant conceptual sources for the defence of this thesis.

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/content/journals/10.1386/tear.13.1-2.137_1
2015-06-01
2024-06-24
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  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): art; coevolution; dystopia; hybridism; smart cities
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