The gendered AI in Her (2013): Sound, synchresis and disconnection in filmic representations | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Taboo–Transgression–Transcendence in Art & Science
  • ISSN: 1477-965X
  • E-ISSN: 1758-9533

Abstract

Motivated by the issues raised by the merging of women and machines in science fiction, this article explores gender representations in Spike Jonze's 2013 film that discusses the interaction between a male human and a disembodied female whose consciousness is held in an artificial intelligence (AI) operating system. One of the primary questions regarding the representation of the female AI is whether the film encourages a feminist perspective, that promotes female subjectivity in the era of the post-human, or it ends up perpetuating visions of women’s oppression and objectification. Visual representations are important when discussing gender binaries, as they can be related to the image and the physical sexual differences. However, the role of sound is also crucial, as it contributes to different readings. In my analysis, I examine the merging and unmerging of audio and visual in the film. The female voice is the focal point of the analysis.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1386/tear_00043_1
2020-10-01
2024-02-28
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Altman, Rick. ( 1992), Sound Theory, Sound Practice, New York and London:: Routledge;.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Chion, Michel. ( 1982), La voix au cinéma, Paris:: Cahiers du cinéma;.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Chion, Michel. ( 1994), Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen, New York:: Columbia University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Doane, Mary Ann. ( 1980;), ‘ The voice in the cinema: The articulation of body and space. ’, Yale French Studies, 60, pp. 3350.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Freud, Sigmund. ( 1919), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, London:: Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis;.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Jonze, Spike. ( 2013), Her, USA:: Warner Bros. Pictures;.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Kornhaber, Donna. ( 2017;), ‘ From posthuman to postcinema: Crises of subjecthood and representation in Her. ’, Cinema Journal, 56:4, pp. 325.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Mulvey, Laura. ( 1975;), ‘ Visual pleasure and narrative cinema. ’, Screen, 16:3, pp. 618.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Prucher, Jeff. ( 2007), Brave New Words: The Oxford Dictionary of Science Fiction, New York:: Oxford University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Silverman, Kaja. ( 1988), The Acoustic Mirror: The Female Voice in Psychoanalysis and Cinema, Bloomington, IN:: Indiana University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Silverman, Kaja. ( 1991;), ‘ Disembodying the female voice. ’, in P. Erens. (ed.), Issues in Feminist Film Criticism, Bloomington and Indianapolis, IN:: Indiana University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Papakyriakopoulou, Katerina. ( [2020] 2022;), ‘ The gendered AI in Her (2013): Sound, synchresis and disconnection in filmic representations. ’, Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research, 18:2&3, pp. 25766, https://doi.org/10.1386/tear_00043_1
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1386/tear_00043_1
Loading
/content/journals/10.1386/tear_00043_1
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): audio-visual; cinema; cyborg; disembodiment; feminism; post-human
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a success
Invalid data
An error occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error