In awe of scores and roars: Audience phenomenological fragmentation between screen and soundtrack | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 14, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1751-4193
  • E-ISSN: 1751-4207

Abstract

Addressing audiences’ enthrallment with film soundtracks that complicate existing notions of cinema immersion, this article offers the original concept of phenomenological fragmentation. To do so, the article considers soundtracks as mnemonic devices and affective textual components that shape audiences’ identities. Additionally, whilst multiplex viewing theatres and technologies endeavour to disembody audio media production and shroud crowds in darkness, the article explores alternative cinematic environments that support phenomenological fragmentation. This is then applied to concert movies as a particular form of event-based experiential cinema where screenings are accompanied with an orchestra that play the soundtrack live. The article then focuses on ‘Live in Concert’ as a case study of this. Thirteen concert attendees were interviewed, evidencing myriad instances of phenomenological immersion and fragmentation that are shaped by autobiographical histories with the film and the novel exhibition context. Resultantly, the research provides the much-needed empirical audience data to film music studies and expands the study of experiential cinema.

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2023-06-26
2024-03-01
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