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Politicizing Artistic Pedagogies: Disciplines, Practices, Struggles
  • ISSN: 2042-793X
  • E-ISSN: 2042-7948

Abstract

The university has now, totally, found its way into our homes. First through demands of the kitchen table to provide the setting for teaching preparation. Then inadvertently: the endless work done with others in mutable workspaces, such as the home, characterizing that same teaching. And now recently, the coronavirus pandemic has found a new, hybrid, teaching space – (working from) home. So, where else is there ‘to seminar’? These questions are not new: Roland Barthes made an everlasting call to ‘outline a space and call it: ’. Henk Slager, whose plea in 2017 to ‘[re]activate [the] “unpredictable rhythm” of the seminar’ echoed Barthes, following artists, activists, teachers and organizers calling for new alternatives to ever-institutionalized formats and modes of education. Much of this – sentimentalizing, reproducing, extracting educational forms – is held within the discursive framework of art’s ‘Educational Turn’. In the light of impact that the ‘move online’ has had on art education I am reframing this question of the seminar’s ‘where’ else and ‘what’ else, again in 2022. Once obvious spaces of art education, clearly defined, are left empty, expensive, expansive and broken. Where ghosts and infrastructures contend with one another, the mechanisms of universities are, in theory, open bare; their complex continues to be impenetrable. This text constellates a set of infrastructural considerations to take stock of what it means to ask this question of ‘where’ else and ‘what’ else in 2022.

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2023-02-07
2024-07-16
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