Exploring artmaking as a source of metaphor for women’s cancer experiences: A phenomenological study | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 13, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2040-2457
  • E-ISSN: 2040-2465

Abstract

Metaphoric language is common in cancer discourse. However, prevailing military and journey metaphors may not capture variation in cancer experiences. In this article, the authors describe an art-based community research programme for women who had experienced cancer. Taking a phenomenological approach, the article examines how artmaking processes and materials were used by the study participants to shape their own metaphoric thought and, thereby, to articulate a more intimate understanding of their cancer experiences. The authors discuss four themes arising from their findings: (1) experiencing metaphor at its source, (2) artworks as insight cultivators, (3) art as process and metaphor for understanding cancer and (4) alternative metaphors for the cancer experience. Artmaking may be a means to enhance phenomenological data collection in the context of cancer experiences. By capturing variation in women’s cancer experiences, it may also lead to improvements in cancer survivorship care.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Canada Research Chairs programme
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/content/journals/10.1386/jaah_00100_1
2022-07-01
2024-04-15
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