Inaugurating discussions of an oral cinema: Placing the translation-to-screen of Scottish community oral storytelling traditions within a wider frame of global filmmaking practice | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 19, Issue 1-2
  • ISSN: 1474-2756
  • E-ISSN: 2040-0578

Abstract

This article seeks to inaugurate the global frame of an oral cinema: a cinema that, to a significant extent, is defined by its relationship to community oral cultures. Whilst the case studies featured are largely those arising from Scotland – in particular Simon Miller’s (2007), Timothy Neat’s (1989) and the author’s own film (currently in post-production) – discussion deliberately reaches outwards to a global, comparative frame drawing upon the more sophisticated treatments of orality in the West African cinemas of Gaston Kaboré and Ousmane Sembene and the Inuit cinema of Zacharius Kunuk. Whilst alive to the dangers of homogenization and destructive, western-led universalisms, this article ultimately attempts to establish a space for utopian montage (Chambers and Higbee 2021a), wherein divergent yet mutually resonant traditions within world cinema may be co-positioned in order to explore aspects of shared practice and solidarity.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1386/ncin_00022_1
2023-02-13
2024-03-04
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Barclay, Barry. ( 2003;), ‘ Celebrating Fourth Cinema. ’, Illusions, 35, pp. 711.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Birnbaum, Jean. ( 2017;), ‘ Translation and conflict: The violence of the universal: A conversation with Étienne Balibar. ’, Verso, 16 February, https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/3100-translation-and-conflict-the-violence-of-the-universal-a-conversation-with-etienne-balibar. Accessed 21 July 2020.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Cather, Willa. ( 1922;), ‘ The novel Démeubl. é’, The New Republic, 30, April, pp. 56.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Chambers, Jamie. ( 2013;), When the Song Dies..
  5. Chambers, Jamie., ( 2014;), Blackbird..
  6. Chambers, Jamie. ( 2018;), ‘ Towards a folk cinema. ’, Screen, 59:1, pp. 8098.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Chambers, Jamie. ( 2022a;), ‘ A cinema close to the people: A critical symposium on folk cinema. ’, Cineaste, summer, pp. 3444.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Chambers, Jamie. ( 2022b;), ‘ Cinema as Ceilidh and Hui: The place of audience within emergent perspectives upon a folk cinema. ’, in M. Hjort, and T. Nanicelli. (eds), Motion Pictures and Public Value, Hoboken, NJ:: Wiley-Blackwell;, pp. 399424.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Chambers, Jamie. ( 2022c;), ‘ Mysterious objects: Exploring imaginary community, community imagination and cinematic translations of Scottish oral traditions within documentary film production and post-production. ’, Journal of Media Practice and Education, 23:4, pp. 31528.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Chambers, Jamie, and Higbee, Will. ( 2021a;), ‘ Emergent transnational perspectives upon a folk cinema. ’, Transnational Screens, 12:1, pp. 4161.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Chambers, Jamie, and Higbee, Will. ( 2021b;), ‘ Utopian montage: Exploring transnational folk cinemas online as part of the 2020 Folk Film Gathering film festival during the Covid-19 pandemic. ’, Open Screens, 4:1, pp. 132.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Clifford, James. ( 1997), Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century, Cambridge, MA:: Harvard University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Clifford, James. ( 2013), Returns: Becoming Indigenous in the Twenty-First Century, Cambridge, MA:: Harvard University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Diawara, Manthia. ( 1987;), ‘ Narratology in “Wend Kuuni”. ’, Présence Africaine, 142, pp. 3649.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Diawara, Manthia. ( 1988;), ‘ Popular culture and oral traditions in African film. ’, Film Quarterly, 41:3, pp. 614.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Eisenstein, Sergei. ( 1969), Film Form: Essays in Film Theory, San Diego, CA:: Harcourt (Harvest Books);.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Gabriel, Teshome. ( 1982), Third Cinema in the Third World: The Aesthetics of Liberation, Ann Arbor, MI:: University of Michigan;.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Geertz, Clifford. ( 1973), The Interpretation of Cultures, New York:: Basic Books;.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Gibson, Ross. ( 2018;), ‘ Foreword: Cognitive two-steps. ’, in C. Batty, and S. Kerrigan. (eds), Screen Production Research: Creative Practice as a Mode of Enquiry, London:: Palgrave Macmillan;.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Hall, Stuart. ( 1986;), ‘ On postmodernism and articulation: An interview with Stuart Hall. ’, Journal of Communication Inquiry, 10:2, pp. 4560.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Hall, Stuart. ( 2018;), ‘ Race, articulation, and societies structured in dominance [1980]. ’, in D. Morley. (ed.), Stuart Hall: Selected Writings: Essential Essays, Volume 1: Foundations of Cultural Studies, Durham, NC:: Duke University Press;, pp. 172221.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Hassan, Mamoun. ( 1993;), ‘ Working with Bill. ’, in E. Dick,, A. Noble, and D. Petrie. (eds), Bill Douglas: A Lanternist’s Account, London:: BFI Publishing;, pp. 22732.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Kaboré, Gaston. ( 1982), Wend Kuuni, Burkina Faso:.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Knopf, Kerstin. ( 2008), Decolonising the Lens of Power: Indigenous Films in North America, Amsterdam:: Editions Rodopi B.V;.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Martin-Jones, David. ( 2010;), ‘ Islands at the edge of history: Landscape and the past in recent Scottish-Gaelic films. ’, in D. Iordanova., et al. (eds), Cinema at the Periphery, Detroit, MI:: Wayne University Press;, pp. 15674.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Martin-Jones, David. ( 2015;), ‘ Gaelic film-making in Scotland. ’, in B. Nowlan, and Z. Finch. (eds), Directory of World Cinema: Scotland, Bristol and Chicago, IL:: Intellect;, p. 27.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. McLuhan, Marshall. ( 1964), Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, New York:: Mentor;.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Miller, Simon. ( 2007;), Seachd: The Inaccessible Pinnacle..
  29. Naficy, Hamid. ( 2001), An Accented Cinema, Princeton, NJ:: Princeton University Press;.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Neat, Timothy. ( 1989;), Play Me Something..
  31. Neat, Timothy. ( 2016;), ‘ Invisible cinema: John Berger, Play Me Something and Walk Me Home. ’, in R. Hertel, and D. Malcolm. (eds), On John Berger: Telling Stories, Leiden and Boston, MA:: Brill Rodopi;, p. 328.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Ondaatje, Michael, and Murch, Walter. ( 2008), The Conversations: Walter Murch and the Art of Editing Film, London:: Bloomsbury;.
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Ong, Walter. ( 2002), Orality and Literacy, London:: Routledge;.
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Sayles, John. ( 1994;), The Secret of Roan Inish..
  35. Schlesinger, Philip. ( 1990;), ‘ Scotland, Europe and identity. ’, in E. Dick. (ed.), From Limelight to Satellite: A Scottish Film Book, Edinburgh:: Scottish Film Council and British Film Institute;, p. 229.
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Sembene, Ousmane. ( 1977;), Ceddo..
  37. Shohat, Ella, and Stam, Robert. ( 1994), Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media (Sightlines), London:: Routledge;.
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Stoneman, Rod. ( 2013;), ‘ Global interchange: The same, but different. ’, in M. Hjort. (ed.), The Education of the Filmmaker in Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas (Global Cinema), New York:: Palgrave Macmillan;, pp. 5978.
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Chambers, Jamie. ( 2021;), ‘ Inaugurating discussions of an oral cinema: Placing the translation-to-screen of Scottish community oral storytelling traditions within a wider frame of global filmmaking practice. ’, New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film, 19:1&2, pp. 321, https://doi.org/10.1386/ncin_00022_1
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1386/ncin_00022_1
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a success
Invalid data
An error occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error