Female soldiers in TV series: A comparative analysis of Israel and Serbia | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Women and Girls in Popular Television in the Age of Post-Feminism
  • ISSN: 1601-829X
  • E-ISSN: 2040-0586

Abstract

Popular television has always been fascinated by military life and the male soldier. However, the image of the female soldier tends to attract less attention, despite her significant role on the battlefield, in military operations, and as part of army life. Hence, the question of the female soldier’s inclusion in military TV series calls for special attention. The cultural militarism prevalent in Israel and Serbia presents a unique opportunity to investigate how female soldiers are represented in popular TV series. In order to decode the televised female soldier, a post-feminist inquiry of two popular TV series – one from Israel and one from Serbia – was conducted. This analysis suggests that in both the popular TV series, female soldiers are attractive, well-groomed women who succeed in maintaining a feminine aesthetic, even in moments of severe military crisis. At the same time, they adhere to their female individuality and freedom of choice. And perhaps most importantly, they epitomize the dilemmas of contemporary feminism by hybridizing ‘me’ with ‘we’, individuality with collectivity, a moral stand with personal commitment and femininity with masculinity.

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2022-06-01
2024-04-14
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