Our moving bodies as waka/vaka: Explorations through Ori Paraparau | Body Conversations | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Southern Oceanic Choreographic Practices
  • ISSN: 2040-5669
  • E-ISSN: 2040-5677

Abstract

Ori Paraparau | Body Conversations is an embodied talanoa that engages in a reciprocal and shared vā. Being both a choreographic movement task and Mana Moana methodology, Ori Paraparau allows Moana dancers to warm up their minds, bodies, and the vā they share with one another. The idea of ‘recentring’ ourselves (a similar philosophy to decolonizing) is strong here as it better reflects our hyphened identities and the way we view and experience the world. Within the task we can see our moving bodies as waka/vaka that holds our histories, stories and experiences but also link us back to our ancestors. Our Moana identities are complex and vary between person to person, experiences and stories of our whakapapa bringing us to where we are today. Themes of belonging, childhood memories, returning to self, and the complexities of individual Moana cultural identities are explored and investigated within a comfortable environment. Through engaging in Ori Paraparau we may share, exchange, dance, cry and laugh our way through it whilst also building, nurturing and strengthening the vā.

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2023-12-22
2024-05-24
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