Translating a Monster: Motherhood and Horror Criteria in Ringu and The Ring | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 14, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2042-1869
  • E-ISSN: 2042-1877

Abstract

Monsters constitute an essential aspect of any society, but their imprinted cultural body causes them to fulfill different roles in different cultures. By remaking a monster from a different culture, the mutated entity will fail to reproduce the same meanings since many symbols will be lost in cultural appropriation and faulty translation. This article analyzes such loss of meaning in the portrayal of one relevant monster in Eastern culture (the onryō) in a Western context of horror movie mania, decoding the underlying gender politics ingrained in the Japanese movie (1998) and its Hollywood remake (2002).

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2023-10-25
2024-05-29
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