1981
Volume 7, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2045-6271
  • E-ISSN: 2045-628X

Abstract

Nature may be considered as the world of living organisms and their environment; in a larger sense, the shape of nature can also be understood to include particular extents of space and time. The visual perspectives of nature form a particular course that begins with the earliest historical depictions and might be currently expressed by a variety of cross-disciplinary contributions. The diverse perspectives form eclectic threads that today are frequently manifested within the eco-activist art movement. Several of the contemporary ecological art projects are grounded in explicit experiences and connections to specific spaces relevant to where the work is created. The local or international ecological labs, experimental urban gardens, projects on the migration of plants and the creation of new species included here are all new models contributing to a speculative future culture.

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2020-12-01
2022-12-04
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  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): activism; eco-activism; ecological art; environment; nature; sense of space
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