Pre-service ESL teachers and undocumented students in the United States | Intellect Skip to content
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Volume 18, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 1751-1917
  • E-ISSN: 1751-1925

Abstract

This article describes a teacher education course that attempts to raise pre-service English as a second language (ESL) teacher candidates’ awareness of undocumented students in US schools. Candidates completed a critical pre-reflection on the first day of class and a critical post-reflection on the last day of class. In the intervening period teacher candidates participated in guided reflective practice to help them process scholarly books, peer-reviewed articles, documentary film and first-person narratives regarding undocumented students and their families. The pre-data indicate most teacher candidates are unaware of undocumented students and the issues they face in school and society. The post-data suggest that encouraging teacher candidates to critically reflect on information regarding undocumented students has potential to make candidates more effective teachers of undocumented students.

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2023-09-12
2024-02-22
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