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1981
Volume 14, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2042-7913
  • E-ISSN: 2042-7921

Abstract

The growth of the hotel industry in Spain in recent decades has meant, among other things, the acceleration of the hotel room attendants’ labour. An overload of physical activity, illnesses, and physical and mental exhaustion are the most visible consequences. Based on a qualitative study carried out with hotel room attendants working in Spanish hotels, the article analyses the effects of work intensification on room attendants’ representation of their bodies. The results show that rather than the typical description of their body as a machine that must withstand high pressure, hotel room attendants define it as a vector body constructed through multiple flows and demands, which has to speed up its pace, being constantly overwhelmed and self-managed in the process. We discuss how the acceleration of work in hotels is the result of a series of organizational and individual practices, impacting the representation and corporal practice of the hotel room attendants.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Agency for Research and Development of Chile (ANID) (Award DOCTORADO BECAS CHILE/2018 – 72190225)
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/content/journals/10.1386/hosp_00067_1
2023-12-05
2024-07-22
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