1981
Volume 12, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1750-3159
  • E-ISSN: 1750-3167

Abstract

Abstract

Using an intersectional Marxist analysis, this brief article surveys issues of, and related to, class in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit musical , including questions of aesthetics, race, narrative, politics and history, as well as how class impacts access to the musical. Sekellick argues that, through its use of hip hop and colour-conscious casting, deploys the affects and aesthetics of people of colour, as well as of revolution, to give an otherwise conservative bootstraps narrative about a white founding father a progressive feeling sheen. The author reads as a neo-liberal version of America’s founding myths, a retelling of the American dream to suit diversified capitalist and political classes.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1386/smt.12.2.257_1
2018-06-01
2022-11-27
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1386/smt.12.2.257_1
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a success
Invalid data
An error occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error