1981
Volume 2, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2045-5879
  • E-ISSN: 2045-5887

Abstract

Abstract

YouTube videos produced by school-aged youth in their own time of their own accord are described, and their implications for art education are considered. The videos are conceived as creative conversations, their productions being the consequence of social networks and self-organizing systems rather than individual psychology. The videos primarily emerge from collaborative interaction between two or more contributors. The phenomenal success of YouTube is noted, including how its interface helps to facilitate conversation. Particular examples of videos are described involving Barbie torture, blending machines and aquatic disasters. Educational implications are drawn, partly by considering what art educators have suggested in the past with regard to former kinds of unsolicited creativity by youth. These include pairing students to create collaboratively, teaching appropriate skills, and going beyond the oftentimes-transgressive subject matter to consider the deeper developmental roles played by unsolicited creativity. The adoption of a mix of pedagogies is advocated.

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/content/journals/10.1386/vi.2.2.115_1
2013-06-01
2022-12-08
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1386/vi.2.2.115_1
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  • Article Type: Article
Keyword(s): conversation; creativity; transgression; visual culture; youth; YouTube videos
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