Skip to content
1981
Volume 13, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2042-8022
  • E-ISSN: 2042-8030

Abstract

I was recently very moved while reading ‘Constructing identity by writing roots into life: A poetic autoethnography’ by Andrew J. Garbisch in which he used a poetic-narrative autoethnography to explore his lived experience as a transracial Asian American adoptee. In it, he shares four of his original poems, following each with a narrative reflection. Favourite lines include the conclusion of his poem, ‘Allegory of the Tsohg’: ‘But you’re not supposed to hear any of this, I should really hush,/ Otherworldly, I’m sorry, I’ve already said too much’. Although I feel largely distanced from much of what is discussed in this piece, including adoption and experiencing the world as a person of colour, I was nevertheless struck by this project and many moments resonated, especially how his efforts to ‘construct meaning of [his] own identity’ was a somewhat ‘haunting endeavor’ (39). He inspired me to try and write a piece that ‘take[s] a bird’s eye view’ (43) of my educator journey and self – that is, how I am wrangling with reconciling that my years in academia have now eclipsed my previous time spent as a secondary English teacher. Because I have found arts-based research methods, such as narrative and poetic inquiry, to be quite generative (see, e.g. Author 2022, 2020, 2019, 2018a, 2018b), I immediately understood Garbisch’s piece as an inspiring mentor text – an exemplar of sorts for how to write to wrestle with the (albeit completely differently) somewhat haunting identity work that I find myself moving through presently. I love his bringing together of methodologies that I have used independent of one another but had not yet melded before. As such, his approach, structure and exercise in vulnerable arts-based work largely inspired this ‘micro’, snapshot-style project, which is also built on my learning from arts-based researchers, poets and storytellers I admire (e.g. Clandinin and Connelly 2000; James 2009, 2017; Sameshima et al. 2017; Faulkner 2019; Prendergast et al. 2009, among others). They have taught me a great deal, including how poetic inquiry can be a way of living in the world (Leggo cited in Irwin et al. 2019) and that narrative inquiry might consist of telling stories from our past that lead to possibilities of retellings and potential futures (Clandinin and Connelly 2000); such teachings also deeply inform this piece.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • The Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship program (Award 454525)
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1386/btwo_00095_1
2024-02-23
2024-07-12
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Belcourt, B.-R. (2019), NDN Coping Mechanisms: Notes from the Field, Toronto: House of Anansi Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Blume, C. (2022), Gigglepuss, Hamilton: Guernica Editions.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Clandinin, D. J. and Connelly, F. M. (2000), Narrative Inquiry: Experience and Story in Qualitative Research, San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Faulkner, S. (2019), Poetic Inquiry: Craft, Method, and Practice, New York: Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Garbisch, A. J. (2021), ‘Constructing identity by writing roots into life: A poetic autoethnography’, Journal of Poetry Therapy, 34:1, pp. 3747, https://doi.org/10.1080/08893675.2020.1846865.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Irwin, R., Hasbe-Ludt, E. and Sinner, A. (2019), Storying the World: The Contributions of Carl Leggo on Language and Poetry, New York: Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. James, K. (2009), ‘Cut-up consciousness and talking trash: Poetic inquiry and the spam bot’s text’, in M. Prendergast, C. Leggo and P. Sameshima (eds), Poetic Inquiry: Vibrant Voices in the Social Sciences, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, pp. 5974.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. James, K. (2017), ‘What lovely words might also mean’, in P. Sameshima, A. Fidyk, K. James and C. Leggo (eds), Poetic Inquiry: Enchantment of Place, Wilmington, DE: Vernon Press, pp. 2327.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Kondo, M. (2014), The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Moore, A. (2018), ‘Eight events for entering a PhD: A poetic inquiry into happiness, humility, and self-care’, Qualitative Inquiry, 24:8, pp. 59296, https://doi.org/10.1177/1077800417745101.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Moore, A. (2018), ‘“Blackboxing it”: A poetic min/d/ing the gap of an imposter experience in Academia’, Art/Research International: A Transdisciplinary Journal, 3:1, pp. 3052, https://doi.org/10.18432/ari29358.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Moore, A. (2019), ‘Alleviating anxiety through the abecedarian: On supporting new doctoral Students’, LEARNing Landscapes, 12:1, pp. 17182, https://doi.org/10.36510/learnland.v12i1.986.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Moore, A. (2020), ‘Pulping as poetic inquiry: On upcycling “upset” to reckon anew with rape culture, rejection, and (re)turning to trauma texts’, Cultural Studies ↔ Critical Methodologies, 20:6, pp. 58895, https://doi.org/10.1177/1532708620912802.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Moore, A. (2022), ‘Dot-dot-dot: A feminist critical poetic inquiry of silence in teacher candidates’ responses to teaching sexual assault narratives’, Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 19:2, pp. 6484, https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/article/view/40712/36704.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Prendergast, M., Leggo, C. and Sameshima, P. (2009), Poetic Inquiry: Vibrant Voices in the Social Sciences, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Sameshima, P., Fidyk, A., James, K. and Leggo, C. (2017), Poetic Inquiry: Enchantment of Place, Wilmington, DE: Vernon Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Wordsworth, W. (1807), ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’, Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45521/i-wandered-lonely-as-a-cloud. Accessed 30 January 2023.
/content/journals/10.1386/btwo_00095_1
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a success
Invalid data
An error occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error