Quarantine encounters with digital animals: More-than-human geographies of lockdown life | Intellect Skip to content
1981
Volume 1 Number Supplement 1
  • ISSN: 2632-2463
  • E-ISSN: 2632-2471

Abstract

Quarantine conditions led to the proliferation of digital encounters with nonhuman animals. Here, we explore three prominent forms: creaturely cameos, avatar acquaintances and background birding. These virtual encounters afforded during lockdown life generated novel and affective human–animal relations that could have lasting effects for humans and nonhumans post-quarantine, posing interesting questions for more-than-human scholarship.

This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY). To view a copy of the licence, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
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2020-06-01
2024-03-02
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